ENG 102 College Writing II

Saint Martin's University Summer 2009

1st  Session, 1-2:40 p.m. MTWTH 

 

 

 

Dr. Olivia Archibald

&

Scot Harrison, Director

Old Main 211

Reference

O’Grady Library

360 438-4537

Librarian/Faculty:

360-486-8808

oarchibald@stmartin.edu

 

sharrison@stmartin.edu

 

Writing TutorsKatie and Becky, Learning Center, OM 214, Ext. 4569

 

Texts

Lynn Bloom and Edward White.  Inquiry:  Questioning, Reading, and Writing.  2nd ed.  Upper Saddle River, NJ:  Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2004.

Andrea Lunsford.  The St. Martin’s Handbook.  6th ed.  Boston:  Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2008. 

 

Other Materials:

Dictionary; 6 manila folders; a 3” computer disk

 

Course Description:

ENG 102 College Writing II is a one-semester course that offers you further opportunities to engage in and to examine critically that form of nonfiction called the “essay.”  As with ENG 101 College Writing I, College Writing II is designed to develop reading, writing, and thinking skills you will need in many university courses.  Its purpose is to augment and further refine the writing skills developed in College Writing I and to provide practice in writing various examples of argumentative essays supported by research.  A fundamental assumption upon which the course is based is that, in order to write clearly, one must think clearly; therefore, the two processes, thinking and writing, are interwoven throughout all the work of the course.  The readings assigned should be used to generate topics and serve as material for essays and research.  

 

Goals: ENG 102 College Writing II is designed to enable students:

  1. To experience and practice thinking, reading, and writing as essentially related activities, with the assumption that, in order to write effectively, one must think clearly and read critically.
  2. To develop a critical awareness of oneself as a writer.
  3. To develop and practice strategies to approach various kinds of writing assignments in several disciplines.
  4. To develop and practice skills in research, including online research.
  5. To develop and practice skills in writing the argumentative essay.
  6. To develop and practice skills in research documentation.
  7. To understand writing as a creative and cyclical process of planning, drafting, and revising.
  8. To further develop skills in using computers effectively for writing assignments.
  9. To transfer the abilities and skills learned in this course to other areas of life, both academic and non-academic.

 

Expectations:

1.       Attendance.  You are expected to attend each class and come to class on time.  Repeated absence and/or excessive lateness will affect the Daily Work grade in this course.  Excessive absences (more than 4) will result in failing the course.  It is important to realize that missing class will affect your course grade.  A total of 30% of your grade is based on daily activities we do.  If you are not in class, you have failed to do that class’s activity.  I take attendance each meeting; I mark unexcused absences as a zero for the day.  The easiest way to fail the course is not to attend class. 

2.       Class Preparation.  You should come to class with all assignments carefully read and be prepared to actively engage yourself in all class activities.  These activities include thinking, listening, speaking, and writing involving such projects as individual writing activities, small group work, and large group discussion. 

3.       Due Dates.  You are expected to honor all due dates for reading and writing assignments. 

4.       Writing Assignments.  Writing assignments will include in-class writings, pre-writing activities, drafts, revisions, and completed essays.  In this class your major projects are two research-based essays (with multiple draft deadlines), an annotated bibliography, and a report on your first research project.  Failure to do one or more of these assignments means failure of the course.  Alongside other due dates, you will present these writing projects to me at the end of the summer session in a manila folder that I call a “portfolio.”  Your final is writing an evaluation in the form of a letter on your major writing assignments inside this portfolio. To pass the course, portfolios must have the two assigned essays, the annotated bibliography, the report on the first research project, and the final.  Portfolios will be turned in on the day of the final. 

5.       Folders.  You are expected to turn in final drafts of each project in a manila folder.  Additional material in the folder must also include first drafts with peer response forms attached and xeroxed copies of library sources used. 

6.       Essay Guidelines.  Unless otherwise indicated, completed essays must be typed, double-spaced, and written in writing conventions appropriate to academic writing.  Although not a requirement, first drafts of essays should also be typed.  If you wish my comments on your piece prior to revision, first drafts must be typed and meet stipulated first draft due dates 

7.       Workshopping Essays.  Several of your writing assignments will be structured around the premise that, prior to revision, your first drafts will be “workshopped” (read, with suggestions for improvement given) by class members.  You are expected to participate in peer writing group workshops.  Participation means that you are in attendance, have a complete draft to share, and will give feedback in the workshop to student writings.  Students who do not fully participate in these writing workshops have an immediate grade reduction of one letter grade in the essay’s final evaluation. 

8.       Computer Classroom.  This is a writing course that will spend class days in a computer-supported classroom.  A requirement of this class is that, when we meet in the computer classroom for research and/or writing activities, all students will work on the computers in the room.  Another requirement is that all students must have university email accounts.  If any of these requirements will not work for you, you need to transfer to another class.

9.       Course Texts.  To be in this class, students must purchase course texts and bring these to class on the days material has been assigned for discussion. 

10.    Activities in the Library.  You are expected to participate fully in activities and workshops scheduled during class time in the library classroom.  Full participation means you are in attendance and are actively engaged in the tasks assigned during the entire class period

11.    Academic Honesty.  All work must be original (your own) and, when needed, properly documented.  Even though you will occasionally work in groups on writing activities with other class members, I expect all essays and other written assignments to be the product of your own work, unless otherwise stated.  Research sources must be properly cited following documentation criteria established in the course.  This class abides with the University’s policy on plagiarism as detailed in the University’s Student Handbook.  If you plagiarize, you will receive an F on the assignment, you may receive an F for the course, and the university may take disciplinary action against you.

 

 

 

Special Arrangements

If you need course adaptations or accommodations because of a disability, if you have medical and/or safety concerns to share with me, or if you need special arrangements in case the building must be evacuated, please see me as soon as possible.

0312396945_cs
 

Summer Library Hours

Since this class requires all major assignments to be researched using a university library, you need to coordinate your research with library hours.  This summer, the library’s hours are

Monday - Thursday:

8 a.m. - 8 p.m.

Friday

8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Saturday:

9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Sunday:

closed

 

Evaluation

1.  Daily work (completion and discussion of reading assignments; listening, thinking, and speaking activities; writing group work; journal) = 30%.

2.  Portfolio (completed essays and other major projects; see information on Portfolio Grading below for specifics) = 70%

 

Portfolio Grading

I use portfolio grading to assess your progress in developing writing skills and to evaluate the quality of your essays during the semester.  Your portfolio is a manila folder of writings you have collected during the course.  Material in the portfolio will include final drafts of all four major research essays, the interview report, a portfolio letter, and several of the in-class writings you have done during the semester. To pass the course, portfolios must have the two assigned essays, the annotated bibliography, the report on the first week’s research project, and the letter.  Portfolios will be turned in on the last day of the course

 “A” portfolios will contain work of impressive quality that demonstrates thorough, thoughtful analysis and assignment interpretation.  The quality of the ideas in the portfolio’s writings is truly outstanding and demonstrates attention to comments from peers and me.  The pieces evidence an excellent command of standard academic conventions.  You have been successful in meeting all due dates for drafts, including those for writing group workshops.

“B” portfolios will contain work of impressive quality that demonstrates thorough analysis and good assignment interpretation.  The quality of the ideas in the portfolio’s pieces will be good.  The material evidences at least a good command of standard academic conventions.  You have been successful in meeting all due dates for drafts, including those for writing group workshops.

 “C” portfolios will contain work that has interpreted the assignment correctly and is of adequate quality.  Pieces demonstrate attention to the assignment but don’t go beyond it in any substantive way.   The material evidences at least an adequate command of standard academic conventions. 

“D” and “F” portfolios will contain work that evidences inadequate attention to ideas, to specifics of each assignment, and/or to standard academic conventions.

 

Submitting Assignments in Moodle

You are often assigned to summarize an essay or complete a specific writing task as part of daily assignments.  These assignments will be submitted to me via Moodle, a course management system which also will be a place that posts the course syllabus and some other handouts.  Moodle does not allow submission of summaries after the day and time they are due, which is 10 minutes before class begins on the day they are due.  If you miss submitting a summary when it is due, put it in a folder (Class Materials Folder) and turn it in at the end of the semester.  Such assignments do not get full credit for completion unless you have a doctor’s written excuse or if you have made prior arrangements to be absent. The class materials folder with missing summaries is due June 23.

 

Quizzes

Quizzes may be given on essays that have been assigned for reading.   Quizzes can only be made up if you have a doctor’s written excuse or if you have made prior arrangements to be absent.


 

 

ENG 102 COLLEGE WRITING 2 SYLLABUS Summer 2009

DATE

FOCUS

ASSIGNMENTS DUE TODAY

May 18

  • Introductions, course and computer classroom
  • Posting on Moodle
  • Take-home exam distributed
  • In-class writing:  Portrait of Yourself as a Writer

          (Buy texts)

Inquiry04_2e

May 19

·         Essay discussions:  Stories of the Earth

  • Three-day research project:  For the next three days you will be finding sources for Project 1.     Today -- find an online journal article in the library’s online databases that will be a source in your report.  Take step-by-step notes on finding this source.  Print your article and be prepared to share information from it tomorrow.  You will use this as one of your sources in a written report due next Wednesday.
  • Handout on MLA Works Cited page. 
  • Activate SMC email account (to be in this class you are required to have and to use a univ. email account) at the Reference Assistance Desk in the library. 
  • Purchase texts for course if you haven’t done this yet (a requirement to remain in class).
  • Read “Hearing Voices” (314+) and “Playing God in the Garden” (185+). 
  • Summary of both essays (1 paragraph per essay) due at the beginning of class today.
  • Continue working on The St Martin’s Handbook take-home exam (due Thursday)

 

May 20

·         Essay discussions:  Stories of the Earth

  • Avoiding Plagiarism
  • 2nd day of 3-day research project.  Today -- Find a PAPER (not online) journal article that will be a source in your report.  This journal article must be available in the Saint Martin’s University Collection.  Take step-by-step notes on finding this source.  Xerox a copy and be prepared to share information from it tomorrow. 
  • Read “The Clan of the One-Breasted Women” (411+) Summary of essay (1 paragraph) due at the beginning of class.

and

  • Read “Genetics and Human Malleability” (688+) Summary of essay (1 paragraph) due at the beginning of class.
  • Have change for Xeroxing
  • Read Handbook, Chapter 16 (no summary required).  Take your time to read carefully and absorb this chapter.  You must avoid plagiarism at all cost.

 

 

May 21

 

·         Essay discussions: Stories of the Earth

  • MLA style for bibliography.
  • 3rd day of 3-day research project.  Today -- find a book that will be a source in your report.  Take step-by-step notes on finding this source.   Xerox the pages (a chapter?) that you will use in your report.  You will also use this source in your report due Wednesday.
  • Take-home exam due.
  • Read “The Obligation to Endure” (555+) Summary of essay (1 paragraph) due at the beginning of class.

and

  • Read “Troubled Waters” (562+) Summary of essay (1 paragraph) due at the beginning of class.

 

DATE

FOCUS

ASSIGNMENTS DUE TODAY

May 25

M

NO CLASS--MEMORIAL DAY HOLIDAY

 

 

writing pen

  • Developing an argument and creating an argumentative thesis statement:  Read Handbook, Chapter 11 (no summary required).  Take your time to read carefully and absorb this chapter.  Writing a good argument underpins all essay assignments in this course.
  • Read “Why Mothers Should Stay Home” (287+) Summary of essay (1 paragraph) due tomorrow.
  • Read “The Singer Solution to World Poverty” (248+) Summary of essay (1 paragraph) due tomorrow.

 

 

 

Weeks 2 and 3 Finding Sources; Developing an Argumentative Thesis

DATE

FOCUS

ASSIGNMENTS DUE TODAY

May 26

 

 

·         Essay discussions:  Ethics

 

  • Project 2 assigned

 

  • Developing a thesis

 

  • Read “Thoughts in the Presence of Fear” (678+) Summary of essay (1 paragraph) due at the beginning of class.
  • Read “First Observations” (177+) Summary of essay (1 paragraph) due at the beginning of class.
  • Read Handbook, Chapters 14 and 17 (no summary required).  Take time to read these chapters since research underpins all your major projects in this class. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

pen%20on%20computer%20disk


 

 

DATE

FOCUS

ASSIGNMENTS DUE TODAY

May 27

Peer Writing Group Workshop

manwoman1.jpg

 

 

Essay discussion:  Ethics

MLA style for documentation of in-text quotes and paraphrases.

  • Three-day research project:  Create an annotated bibliography (with summary and evaluation) of four potential sources focusing on the subject of ethics.  Today -- find an online journal article dealing with the subject of ethics.  Take step-by-step notes on finding this source.  Print a copy and create an annotated bibliographic entry.

 

  • Project 1 due.
  • Read “Good Work, Well Done:  A Psychological Study” (256+) Summary of essay (1 paragraph).
  • Read “Serving in Florida” (264+) Summary of essay (1 paragraph) due at beginning of class.

  • Review Handbook Chapter 18.  Review this chapter well enough that you can successfully use it as the source of how to create your bibliographic entries.

 

 

 

 

books2.jpg

May 28

 

 

(No class meeting)

  • Read “Civil Disobedience” (370+) Summary of essay (1 paragraph) due Monday.

 

June 1

M

  • Essays discussions:  Ethics
  • 2nd day of research project -- find a PAPER journal article on the subject of ethics available in the Saint Martin’s Univ. Collection.  Take step-by-step notes on finding this source.  Xerox a copy and create an annotated bibliographic entry.    
  • Conferences 

 

  • Read “When Doctors Make Mistakes” (273+) Summary of essay (1 paragraph).

 

 

  • Read Handbook, Chapter 15 (no summary required).  You should leave this chapter with an understanding of how to integrate sources into an argumentative paper

June 2

 

·         Essay discussions:  Ethics

  • MLA style for bibliography.
  • 3rd day of research project -- find a chapter from a book and a reference with statistical information, both dealing with the subject of ethics.  Take step-by-step notes on finding this source.  Print a copy of the section of the book you are evaluating and copy the pages(s) of statistical information.  Create an annotated bibliographic entry for these last two sources.   
  • Conferences

 

 

  • Read “The Golden Rule” (234+) Summary of essay (1 paragraph).

and

  • Review “Genetics and Human Malleability: (688+).  (previously read).

 

DATE

FOCUS

ASSIGNMENTS DUE TODAY

June 3

 

Essay discussion:  Teaching History

Writing argument

Conferences

 

 

  • Read “America Revisited” (587+). Summary of essay (1 paragraph) due at the beginning of class.
  • Read “The Naked Source” (596+). Summary of essay (1 paragraph) due at the beginning of class.

 (Annotated bibliography and research notes due tomorrow.)

June 4

Good writing exercise

Peer writing group workshop.

Complete draft of Annotated bibliography due (including notes detailing research).   Have with you 5 copies.  The draft you give me at the end of the workshop must be in a folder with copies of all sources, research notes, and all reader response forms that were completed by your peers in today’s workshop.

June 8

M

Project 3 assigned

Essay discussion:  War

Paraphrase workshop

Conferences

 

 

  • Read “Warfare Is Only an Invention—Not a Biological Necessity” (654+) Summary of essay (1 paragraph) due at the beginning of class.
  • Review Handbook, Chapter 15.  You have already read this once, but you will want to review what paraphrase is and how to paraphrase before this workshop. 

 

Weeks 4 and 5 Finding Sources;  Developing an Argument

June 9

 

 

Direct quotes workshop

Essay discussion: War

Conferences

 

 

  • Read “American Ignorance of War” (661+) Summary of essay (1 paragraph) due at the beginning of class.
  • Review Handbook, Chapter 15.  You have already read this once, but you will want to review how and when to use direct quotes before this workshop

June 10

Block quotes workshop

Essay discussion:  War & Peace

Good writing exercise

Conferences

 

  • Read “Disarmament” (683+). Summary of essay (1 paragraph) due at the beginning of class.
  • Review Handbook, Chapter 15.  Focus on block quotes.

June 11

 

Essay discussion:  Computer literacy

Sharing first page

Conferences

 

·       First page of Project 3 due.

  • Read “Http.//www.when is enough enough?” (623).  Summary of essay (1 paragraph) due at the beginning of class. 

·         Read Handbook Chapter 7 (no summary required.)  As you read this chapter, ask yourself, “How well have I followed the suggestions in this chapter as I wrote my first projects?  What do I need to remember as I revise my papers and as I begin future research projects?” 

 June 15

M

 

Essay discussion:  Cloning

Sharing first two-three pages.

  • First 2-3 pages of Project 3 due.
  • Read “The Media and the Ethics of Cloning” (693+).  Summary of essay (1 paragraph) due at the beginning of class.

 

 

Weeks 5 and 6      Processes and Final Products

 

DATE

FOCUS

ASSIGNMENTS DUE

June 16

 

Good writing exercise

Writing Group Workshop

 

 

4th project assigned

Complete draft of Project 3 due.  Have with you 5 copies of your essay.  The draft you give me at the end of the workshop must be in a folder with copies of all sources and all reader response forms that were completed by your peers in today’s workshop.

 

June 17

 

Project 4 lab.

Good writing exercise

Conferences

 

Research and Writing Project 4

 

graph

 

June 18

Project 4 lab.

Good writing exercise

Conferences

 

 

 

·         Research and Writing Project 4
  • Read Handbook Chapter 6 (no summary required.)  My goal here is that you will leave this chapter with a good understanding of how to paragraph.

June 22

M

 

Writing group workshop

Complete draft of Project 4 due (including notes detailing research).   Have with you 5 copies of your essay. 

 

June 23

 

Project 4 lab.

Good writing exercise

Conferences

 

  • Class Materials Folder due
  • Read Handbook Chapters 28 and 28 (no summary required).  My goal here is that you will leave these chapters with a deep understanding of the importance of word choice in your writings.

 

June 24

Preparations for final

 

 

 

 

June 25

Complete portfolio due and final

 

 

 

book6.jpg

 

 

Last Updated 07/28/2010