Current Classes:  William Lee Jackson

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Term 1 2015

 

HIS/PLS385

Political Ideologies

The Development of Western social and political thought since 1700.

Emphasis on the ideas of liberalism, socialism and fascism.

August 10 to October 3, 2015

 

INSTRUCTOR: William Lee Jackson                E-Mail: wjackson@stmartin.edu

 REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS: Andrew Heywood, Political Ideologies-An Introduction, Palgrave Macmillan, 5th edition, 2012.

 COMMUNICATIONS: Through Quick Mail in Canvas or Ask the Instructor Forum.

 COURSE OBJECTIVES: Upon completion, the student should be able to gather information, draw reasonable conclusions and demonstrate, by speaking and writing, an understanding of these principles of political ideology:

                     

                                   Ideology and Ideologies Chapter 1

                                  Liberalism Chapter 2

                                  Conservatism Chapter 3                

                                   Socialism Chapter 4

                                  Anarchism Chapter 5

                                  Nationalism Chapter 6

                                   Fascism Chapter 7

                                  Feminism Chapter 8

                                  Ecologism Chapter 9

                                   Religious Fundamentalism Chapter 10

                                  Multiculturalism Chapter 11

                          Post-Ideological Idea Chapter 12

 How to Get Started with Moodle

 1.   Visit:  http://moodle.stmartin.edu/mod/resource/view.php?id=135288

2.   If you don’t have a SMU network account, go to:  http://www.stmartin.edu/its/technologyhelp/accounts/accountcreation.aspx

3.   For Technology Support, you can go to: 

http://www.stmartin.edu/library/technology/


INSTRUCTOR:

         

 

 

 

 

William Lee Jackson

 

E-Mail: wjackson@stmartin.edu

 

My name is William Lee Jackson. I was born in Kansas City, Missouri shortly before my father was recalled to active duty with the United States Air Force. We lived in San Antonio, Denver, Great Falls, Mountain Home and even a year in Bermuda before he was assigned to McChord. Since arriving in the Pacific Northwest after seeing the entire rest of the county, none of our family has left. I graduated from Curtis High School and Washington State University (BA in Political Science) before being drafted into the U. S. Army. I spent one year stateside in training, got married and spent one year in Vietnam. I then finished a Masters in Political Science at WSU with an additional year of graduate study in History. I had a brief career with the Veterans Administration and a year of intensive study of Organizational Development at The Evergreen State College. I began teaching at the Fort Lewis extension for Saint Martin’s in 1976. I teach a variety of courses in history and political science. I also teach for Pierce College at Fort Lewis and have taught for Tacoma Community College, Grays Harbor College and Olympic College. I live with my golden retrievers Macy in the rapidly growing Northwest Landing development of DuPont. It is my goal that you learn much and have a pleasurable eight-week experience during this course. Please feel free to contact me using the MAIL ICON located on the homepage with your questions and concerns.

 CLASS MANAGEMENT:

        My approach to this course is based upon the following assumptions of the Constructivist Theory of Learning borrowed from Dr. Joan D. McMahon, Human Resource Development, Towson University, Towson, MD  21252  mcmahon@towson.edu):

 Learners are independent and self-directed. Learners take responsibility for their own learning. They ask questions instead of someone else asking for them. They seek out information, instead of being directed to do so. They are proactive in learning rather than reactive.

 Learners can generate new knowledge. As a professor, I actually cannot "teach" you anything.  I can expose you to learning opportunities, but only you can learn. Learning is based on reflection and on the interpretation of the experiences, ideas, and assumptions you gained from prior learning.

 Learners can utilize the resources available to them. The main resources that are available to you in this course are the professor, your peers and the textbooks. I will provide the class framework, but it is up to you to make sure that you get what you need from me, the textbook, other learners, the internet, and other resources to be successful in the course. Within certain courtesy limits, I am as available to you as you need me to be electronically. Learners vary in their learning objectives for this course. Some learners are using this course to learn new tools. Some learners just want to complete a course required in the program. Some learners don't care about their grades, while others have other priorities at this time and simply want the "letter grade." No matter what your motivation, I am happy to help you achieve your goal if you let me know what it is.

 Learners collaborate willingly. Learners are willing to share ideas/resources. It is through idea exchange that critical thinking skills and knowledge-generation occur. 

 Learners are honorable. I assume that learners will conduct themselves ethically in all course aspects. Honesty and trust are built by mutual respect.  I will try to create an open and sincere environment where you can freely discuss learning issues and provide constructive feedback to each other.

 These principles lead to the conclusion that the most important element is teaching is to promote student engagement with the material through a variety of learning activities.  Therefore, you will engage the material through reading, lectures and in class seminar.

For convenience this course consists of four segments of three chapters each. I will begin each segment with a lecture about the history of ideology which highlights the important elements of the readings. Your basic source of information will be the text. You are expected to read the assigned material and come to class prepared to discuss it. You should read each assignment carefully, discuss it with your peers and ask any questions you have about the reading material. The lectures by the instructor are designed to highlight or amplify key elements of the reading. I don’t like passive lectures so your involvement is encouraged.  Please come to class prepared and participate.

 In addition we will have an in class seminar after you have read each chapter. For each seminar you will lead one portion of the discussion. You will present a prepared question for us to consider and discuss and facilitate the discussion. The procedures are explained below. You must prepare and post your question in advance in moodle. You will also review and prepare responses for other student posts. Participation in seminars is the graded element for the class. The seminar is to help us all improve our cognitive skills and develop mastery of the material. Reading is on your own time, but not on your own pace. You cannot contribute to discussion unless you keep pace. You can find additional information on my homepage at http://homepages.stmartin.edu/fac_staff/wjackson/

 You are thus expected to engage each piece of material in a variety of ways before going on to the next bit. You are also expected to complete your work within the term dates. Incompletes will be given only if you have finished more than half of the required work and requested it before the end of the term. There is no provision for extra credit work so put forth your best effort from the start.


METHODS OF ASSESSMENT:

Your grade will be determined by how well you demonstrate to the instructor that you understand the material.  You will demonstrate that you understand the material through in class seminars.

We will have a seminar on each chapter of the text. They are not discussions. In a discussion it might be acceptable to simply state your opinion but that is not true in a seminar. They are for us to review the reading material in class. Therefore, there will be an absolute, iron-clad rule in this course that in every seminar question or response you must provide factual information (150 to 250 words).

For each seminar you have five steps: Read, Post, Prepare, Present, Participate. First you should read the entire material, attend the class lecture and pick out something you think important enough for us to review in class. Second prepare your post (background statement and question). Make sure no one else has already posted and post in Moodle. The background is to demonstrate that you under the module and to lay a foundation for the question. The question is one which requires thought and discussion, not a one word answer. It is not a research question but one that is directly related to the text. Both question and answer are found in the text. Please write out your question (150 – 250 words) and post it online at least 48 hours before the seminar. Third come back, review the other posts and prepare to discuss them in class. Fourth you must manage the discussion of your question. It is important that the seminar not get too far away from the substance of the chapter. It is also important that everyone in our class has an opportunity to participate and that the discussion remain orderly and friendly. Fifth you must participate in the seminars of other students.  Here again your responses to other’s questions must be fact based not just opinions. You should visit the online site and review other questions so you can prepare for the seminar. Your participation in each seminar will be graded by the following standard.

This activity is worth 50 points.

Standards: Each element is scored from 0 to 5.

The post was made on time.

The post has one main theme or idea.

It asks us to consider the material in the text.

It contains factual information (150–250 words) from text.

It is grammatically correct, clear, coherent and well-organized.

You managed the discussion effectively to keep us on track.

You assured that everyone had the opportunity to participate.

You contributed to other student seminars.

Your contributions were meaningful and fact based.

Your participation revealed an eager desire to learn.

Grading Standards:

 Your grade will be determined by how well you demonstrate to the instructor that you understand the material. You will demonstrate that you understand the material through in class seminars. There are twelve seminars at 50 points each.

 This makes a total of 600 points.

 Your total point score will be converted to a letter grade according to the chart below.

 

Percentage

Grade

Value Per Credit

96 - 100

A

4.0

90 - 95

A-

3.67

87 - 89

B+

3.33

84 - 86

B

3.00

80 - 83

B-

2.67

77 - 79

C+

2.33

74 - 76

C

2.00

70 - 73

C-

1.67

67 - 69

D+

1.33

64 - 66

D

1.00

60 - 63

D-

0.67

< 60

F

0.00

 

No work will be accepted for grade after October 3, 2015.

 Communication/Participation

 As an instructor, I expect your assignments to be turned in by the due date. If you have an extenuating circumstance, please let me know and we can make arrangements. Communication is truly the key, if I don’t know what you are struggling with, I cannot assist you and that is why I am here! J As a student, you can expect that I will respond to your e-mail within 48 hours (at the latest) and will grade assignments within five (5) days of the due date. Please contact me immediately if you have not heard from me within these timelines.

 COURSE SCHEDULE

 

Date

Objective

Learning Activities

Assessments

August 11

One - three

Lecture

 

August 13

Ideology

Reading and discussion Chapter 1

Seminar 1

August 18

Liberalism

Reading and discussion

Chapter 2

Seminar 2

August 20

Conservatism

Reading and discussion

Chapter 3

Seminar 3

August 25

Four - six

Lecture

 

August 27

Socialism

Reading and discussion

Chapter 4

Seminar 4

September 1

Anarchism

Reading and discussion

Chapter 5

Seminar 5

September 3

Nationalism

Reading and discussion

Chapter 6

Seminar 6

September 8

Seven - nine

Lecture

 

September 10

Fascism

Reading and discussion

Chapter 7

Seminar 7

September 15

Feminism

Reading and discussion

Chapter 8

Seminar 8

September 17

Ecologism

Reading and discussion

Chapter 9

Seminar 9

September 22

Ten - twelve

Lecture

 

September 24

Religious Fundamentalism

Reading and discussion

Chapter 10

Seminar 10

September 29

Multiculturalism

Reading and discussion

Chapter 11

Seminar 11

October 1

Post-Ideology

Reading and discussion

Chapter 12

Seminar 12

 Helpful Links

Ř Link to web site catalog, student policy documents:

o   http://www.stmartin.edu/studentservices/pdf/studenthandbook.pdf

Ř Link to emergency/weather information:

o   http://www.stmartin.edu/extendedlearning/emergency.aspx

Ř Link to Office of Registrar policies and forms:

o   http://www.stmartin.edu/registrar/downloadforms.aspx

o    

Saint Martin’s University’s Resources

 

Ř Saint Martin’s Library Web Site

http://www.stmartin.edu/library/

Ř Library Catalog

Click on "FIND BOOKS" on the left, and then click on "O'GRADY LIBRARY CATALOG" to find books and audio-visual materials available from the St. Martin's University main campus library.

Ř Research Database

Click on "FIND ARTICLES" to access magazines, journal and newspaper database.  Then, click on "SUBJECT GUIDES" to locate subject-specific database or click on "ALL DATABASE" for an alphabetical list of all databases.

Ř Database Access

If you don't already have a username and password for accessing St. Martin's research databases, you can obtain one by filling out the "NETWORK/EMAIL ACCOUNT REQUEST FORM" available at: 

http://www.stmartin.edu/its/technologyhelp/accounts/accountcreation.aspx

Your new username and password should be sent to you via email within 48 hours.

If you don't remember if you have a network account, email help@stmartin.edu, including your student ID number.  When prompted to reset your password, select a password of 6-14 characters, with a mix of caps, numbers and special characters.

 

Research Database

 

St. Martin's library offers students over 80 research databases, including the full-text resources listed below:

Ř ABI/INFORM Trade & Industry (ProQuest)

Covers more than 700 publications representing every major industry.

Ř Academic Search Premier (EBSCOhost)

Indexes over 4000 scholarly and popular publications covering all academic subjects.  Provides full-text for over 1,000 journals, many dating back to 1990.

Ř Business Source Premier (EBSCOhost)

Business-related periodicals covering management, marketing, economics, accounting, international business, and more.  Full-text is available for 3,298 journals (1,032 peer-reviewed).

Ř ERIC (EBSCOhost)

Indexes and provides full-text access to many journal articles, books, theses and related documents in education.

Administrative Requirements

 

Ř Disabilities Support Service Explanation

 

Access/Disability Services:  Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) mandates colleges and universities to provide "reasonable accommodation" to any enrolled student with a disability.  The law protects the student's rights to have an equalized opportunity for learning and for participating in campus programs and activities.  Students have the right to services and reasonable accommodations providing they meet the basic requirements to perform activities of the program.  Saint Martin's University Student Services includes a Disability Support Services office which works with students and potential students.  We arrange those accommodations that allow our students to participate in classes and activities and have equal access to a full education here at the university alongside their fellow students, in whatever format the class is offered.

Students with medically recognized and documented (permanent or temporary) disabilities and who are in need of accommodation have an obligation to notify the University of their needs.  Students who are in need of accommodation should first contact Disability Support Services, LL Library, 438-4580.  If you need accommodations because of a disability, if you have emergency medical information that would be helpful for me to know, or if you need special arrangements in case the building must be evacuated, please make an appointment with me as soon as possible.

 

Ř Academic Dishonesty Policy

Saint Martin's University and your instructor appreciate integrity and honesty.  Please use your own thoughts, words, and ideas for your assignments.  PLAGIARISM will NOT be tolerated.  If quoting from the work of another author, please give credit by acknowledging it in your paper using quotation marks and citing the information sources. For example:  "direct quote (Author name, 2006, page number)".  When paraphrasing (or rephrasing) the work of another author, acknowledge by citing the information source.  For example:  paraphrased comments (Author name, 2006) 

Academic dishonesty consists of any of the following acts:  Assisting another student on examinations, tests, quizzes or other assignments, or receiving assistance from a student without permission of the instructor.  Using unauthorized materials for assistance during examinations, tests or quizzes or other assignments.

Ř Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the act of using the words and ideas of others without giving proper credit.  Common varieties of plagiarism include:

1.   Having another individual write a paper or take an examination for a student.

2.   Directly quoting material without using quotation marks or proper indentation.

3.   Not giving credit for another person's original ideas and organization.

From SMU's "Policies and Procedures", "Academic Information pg. 77-78".      Original URL:  http://www.stmartin.edu/academics/GeneralInfo/PoliciesProcedures.aspx

Plagiarism and cheating are considered unethical actions and a violation of academic policy.  The procedures for dealing with these cases are outlined in the Saint Martin's University Student Handbook.  The Student Handbook can be found at:

http://www.stmartin.edu/studentservices/pdf/studenthandbook.pdf

Ř Request for an Incomplete Grade

The grade of "I" means incomplete and is given for work which is of passing quality but which, because of circumstances beyond the student's control, is not complete.  A student must request an incomplete grade in writing prior to the last week of the semester.  The request must be submitted on the University I Grade request Form to the course instructor and must specify the reason for the request.  The issuance of the grade of I is at the discretion of the faculty member teaching the course.  The approved I Grade Request Form must include specific work required to remove the incomplete.  If the instructor approves, the Office of the Registrar must receive a copy of the I Grade Request Form.

 

Ř Removal of an Incomplete Grade

The removal of an "Incomplete" is the student's responsibility.  All coursework must be completed by the end of the regular semester (Fall or Spring) following the semester in which the incomplete was granted.  An incomplete will remain on the student's transcript for one (1) regular semester (Fall or Spring) beyond the semester in which the "Incomplete" was entered.  At the conclusion of that one semester, the grade of incomplete will be converted in to a grade of "F" unless the instructor has submitted a grade change. 

Original URL and more information can be found at:

http://www.stmartin.edu/academics/GeneralInfo/PoliciesProcedures.aspx

University I Grade Request Form can be found at:

http://www.stmartin.edu/Registrar/DownloadForms.aspx

 

TYPING AND PRESENTATION:

 Papers must be typed, single-spaced (.doc, .docx or .rtf).

Papers are written in paragraphs with no gap between paragraphs.

The first line of each paragraph should be indented five spaces.

Long quotations should be single spaced and indented.

Use one-half inch left, top and bottom and two inch right margins. Use 14 pt. type.

Do not use right-hand justification as it leads to oddly spaced words.

Include the following on the upper corner of the front page:

         Your name

         The course name and number

         The assignment this paper is to complete

         The date the paper was due

         The title of the paper.

Spell check and proof read before submission.

Email the assignment as an attachment on the moodle page for this class.

I do not grade papers without proper citation and sources.

HIS 358

United States 1877 - 1945 (3)

Comprehensive analysis of the emergence of the United States

as a great power.

August 10 to October 3, 2015

INSTRUCTOR: William Lee Jackson E-Mail: wjackson@stmartin.edu

 REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS:

 Mark Walgren Summers, The Gilded Age, Prentice Hall, 1997. and                   

George Donaldson Moss, The Rise of Modern America, Prentice Hall, 1995.

 COURSE OBJECTIVES:

 1.   Upon completion, the student should be able to gather information, draw reasonable conclusions and demonstrate, by speaking and writing, an understanding of Social and Economic Changes to 1877 to 1900.

2.   Upon completion, the student should be able to gather information, draw reasonable conclusions and demonstrate, by speaking and writing, an understanding of Populist Politics 1877 - 1900.

3.   Upon completion, the student should be able to gather information, draw reasonable conclusions and demonstrate, by speaking and writing, an understanding of Progressive Politics 1900 - 1928.

4.   Upon completion, the student should be able to gather information, draw reasonable conclusions and demonstrate, by speaking and writing, an understanding of The Age of Roosevelt 1928 - 1945.

 How to Get Started with Moodle

 1.     Visit:  http://moodle.stmartin.edu/mod/resource/view.php?id=135288

2.     If you don’t have a SMU network account, go to:  http://www.stmartin.edu/its/technologyhelp/accounts/accountcreation.aspx

3.     For Technology Support, you can go to: 

http://www.stmartin.edu/library/technology/

INSTRUCTOR:

 

 

My name is William Lee Jackson. I was born in Kansas City, Missouri shortly before my father was recalled to active duty with the United States Air Force. We lived in San Antonio, Denver, Great Falls, Mountain Home and even a year in Bermuda before he was assigned to McChord. Since arriving in the Pacific Northwest after seeing the entire rest of the county, none of our family has left. I graduated from Curtis High School and Washington State University (BA in Political Science) before being drafted into the U. S. Army. I spent one year stateside in training, got married and spent one year in Vietnam. I then finished a Masters in Political Science at WSU with an additional year of graduate study in History. I had a brief career with the Veterans Administration and a year of intensive study of Organizational Development at The Evergreen State College. I began teaching at the Fort Lewis extension for Saint Martin’s in 1976. I teach a variety of courses in history and political science. I also teach for Pierce College at Fort Lewis and have taught for Tacoma Community College, Grays Harbor College and Olympic College. I live with my golden retriever Macy in the rapidly growing Northwest Landing development of DuPont. It is my goal that you learn much and have a pleasurable eight-week experience during this course. Please feel free to contact me using the MAIL ICON located on the homepage with your questions and concerns

 CLASS MANAGEMENT:

 My approach to this course is based upon the following assumptions of the Constructivist Theory of Learning borrowed from Dr. Joan D. McMahon, Human Resource Development, Towson University, Towson, MD  21252  mcmahon@towson.edu):

Learners are independent and self-directed

Learners can generate new knowledge.

Learners can utilize the resources available to them.

Learners collaborate willingly.

Learners are willing to share ideas/resources.

Learners are honorable.

These principles lead to the conclusion that the most important element is teaching is to promote student engagement with the material through a variety of learning activities.  Therefore, this course consists of four learning modules. Each of the modules contains a reading assignment, a seminar (discussion) assignment and a writing assignment. Your basic source of information will be the text. You are expected to read the assigned material often more than once and come to class prepared to discuss it. You should read each assignment carefully, discuss it with your peers and ask any questions you have about the reading material.

Participation in seminars is a graded element for the class. The seminar is to help us all improve our cognitive skills and develop mastery of the material. Your contribution only counts when the class is on that module. Reading is on your own time, but not on your own pace. You cannot contribute to discussion unless you keep pace. I encourage you to visit the website regularly and often to keep pace with the discussion. Your visits are on your own schedule, but I think they should be at least three times a week. I encourage you to discuss beyond the graded questions and even to create your own chats.

You have one written assignment for each module. The assignments are designed to have you demonstrate understanding of the content so that I can effectively assess how well you have learned. Each of the assignments is designed to test different specific skills that you should develop during your academic career. They are also designed to be progressively more difficult requiring higher levels of cognitive thinking as you move along. You can find additional information at my blog: http://willieonhistory.blogspot.com/

You are thus expected to engage each module of material in a variety of ways before going on to the next. More details about these activities are provided within the learning modules. When you have finished the syllabus you should begin learning module one. You are also expected to complete your work within the term dates. Incompletes will be given only if you have finished more than half of the required work and requested it before the end of the term. There is no provision for extra credit work so put forth your best effort from the start.

METHODS OF ASSESSMENT:

 All Saint Martin’s University assessments are mandatory and must be accomplished as a part of class course work. All materials presented in fulfillment of class objectives are the property of Saint Martin’s University and may be published for educational purposes. Your grade will be determined by how well you demonstrate to the instructor that you understand the in two ways: seminars and written assignments.

In every module you will find a seminar. This is one way we cover the content of the textbook. For each module you will ask a question about some topic in the module. Other students will respond to your question and you may then reply to those responses if you wish. In addition you will answer some of the questions posed by other students and they may reply to your answers. Participation in the seminar is a required element of the class. You should post your question in moodle on the date assigned and prepare to discuss the questions of other students. You should feel free to bring your outside reading into the discussion and share with other students. You should also engage your peers by responding to their questions and comments. Your instructor enjoys answering your questions about history and political science as well as lively discussions about the subject. Do not hesitate to ask.  The details and standards by which you will be graded are provided in the modules.

You also have one written assignment for each of the modules. The assignments are designed to have you demonstrate understanding of the content so that I can effectively assess how well you have learned. Each of the assignments is designed to test different specific skills that you should develop during your academic career. They are also designed to be progressively more difficult requiring higher levels of cognitive thinking as you move along. Each assignment is worth 50 points and should be turned in at the moodle page for this class and are due by 8:00 am Pacific. You must also present your paper in the class discussion. Each of the learning modules in your class contains the information you need including the standard by which it will be graded. Each of the ten elements will be scored 0 to 5 and the total will be your grade on that assignment. Scores on late papers will have score reduced 1 point for each day late.  You can find additional information on my homepage at http://homepages.stmartin.edu/fac_staff/wjackson/

GRADING STANDARDS: 

 Your grade will be determined by how well you demonstrate to the instructor that you understand the material. You will demonstrate that you understand the material in two ways.

There are four seminars at 50 points each.

There are four writing assignments at 50 points each.

This makes a total of 400 points.

Your total point score will be converted to a letter grade according to the chart below.

 

Percentage

Grade

Percentage

Grade

96 - 100

A

74 - 76

C

90 - 95

A-

70 - 73

C-

87 - 89

B+

67 - 69

D+

84 - 86

B

64 - 66

D

80 - 83

B-

60 - 63

D-

77 - 79

C+

< 60

F

 

No work will be accepted for grade after October 3, 2015.

COURSE SCHEDULE

 

Topic/Week

Specific Learning Objectives

Learning Activities

Assessments

Module 1

(Weeks 1 & 2)

 

Students will be able to: gather information, draw reasonable conclusions and demonstrate, by speaking and writing, an understanding of Social and Economic Changes 1877 to 1900.

Scan Summers 1- 3

Read Summers Chapters 4 - 12

review the resource material within Module #1.

Seminar S1

Assignment A1

Module 2

(Weeks  3 & 4)

Students will be able to: gather information, draw reasonable conclusions and demonstrate, by speaking and writing, an understanding of Populist Politics 1877 - 1900.

Read Summers Chapters 13-20

Scan Moss Chapter 1

and review the resource material within Module #2

Seminar S2

Assignment A2

Module 3

(Weeks 5 & 6)

Students will be able to: gather information, draw reasonable conclusions and demonstrate, by speaking and writing, an understanding of Progressive Politics 1900 - 1928.

Read Moss

Chapters 1 - 7

research outside sources and review the resource material within Module #3

Seminar S3

Assignment A3

Module 4

(Weeks 7 & 8)

Students will be able to: gather information, draw reasonable conclusions and demonstrate, by speaking and writing, an understanding of The Age of Roosevelt 1928 - 1945.

Read Moss

Chapters 8 - 14

and an article from a peer reviewed academic journal and review the resource material within Module #4

Seminar S4

Assignment A4

 

Late Submission Policy

 As a student, it is easy to get behind on work when trying to balance life, school, jobs and other demands.  If you are going to be late on an assignment, you are required to call or email me.  Together, we will determine the best course of action to take for the assignment.   If you do not contact me to make arrangements your late submission will not be accepted. Unfortunately, discussion questions cannot be “made up” because we move quickly through each week of material therefore you will not have any classmates to interact with if your responses are late.

 Communication/Participation

 As an instructor, I expect your assignments to be turned in by the due date. If you have an extenuating circumstance, please let me know and we can make arrangements. Communication is truly the key, if I don’t know what you are struggling with, I cannot assist you and that is why I am here! J As a student, you can expect that I will respond to your e-mail within 48 hours (at the latest) and will grade assignments within five (5) days of the due date. Please contact me immediately if you have not heard from me within these timelines.

Helpful Links

 Ř Link to web site catalog, student policy documents:

o   http://www.stmartin.edu/studentservices/pdf/studenthandbook.pdf

Ř Link to emergency/weather information:

o   http://www.stmartin.edu/extendedlearning/emergency.aspx

Ř Link to Office of Registrar policies and forms:

o   http://www.stmartin.edu/registrar/downloadforms.aspx

o    

Saint Martin’s University’s Resources

 

Ř Saint Martin’s Library Web Site

http://www.stmartin.edu/library/

Ř Library Catalog

Click on "FIND BOOKS" on the left, and then click on "O'GRADY LIBRARY CATALOG" to find books and audio-visual materials available from the St. Martin's University main campus library.

Ř Research Database

Click on "FIND ARTICLES" to access magazines, journal and newspaper database.  Then, click on "SUBJECT GUIDES" to locate subject-specific database or click on "ALL DATABASE" for an alphabetical list of all databases.

Ř Database Access

If you don't already have a username and password for accessing St. Martin's research databases, you can obtain one by filling out the "NETWORK/EMAIL ACCOUNT REQUEST FORM" available at: 

http://www.stmartin.edu/its/technologyhelp/accounts/accountcreation.aspx

Your new username and password should be sent to you via email within 48 hours.

If you don't remember if you have a network account, email help@stmartin.edu, including your student ID number.  When prompted to reset your password, select a password of 6-14 characters, with a mix of caps, numbers and special characters.

Research Database

 St. Martin's library offers students over 80 research databases, including the full-text resources listed below:

Ř ABI/INFORM Trade & Industry (ProQuest)

Covers more than 700 publications representing every major industry.

Ř Academic Search Premier (EBSCOhost)

Indexes over 4000 scholarly and popular publications covering all academic subjects.  Provides full-text for over 1,000 journals, many dating back to 1990.

Ř Business Source Premier (EBSCOhost)

Business-related periodicals covering management, marketing, economics, accounting, international business, and more.  Full-text is available for 3,298 journals (1,032 peer-reviewed).

Ř ERIC (EBSCOhost)

Indexes and provides full-text access to many journal articles, books, theses and related documents in education.

Administrative Requirements

 Ř Disabilities Support Service Explanation

Access/Disability Services:  Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) mandates colleges and universities to provide "reasonable accommodation" to any enrolled student with a disability.  The law protects the student's rights to have an equalized opportunity for learning and for participating in campus programs and activities.  Students have the right to services and reasonable accommodations providing they meet the basic requirements to perform activities of the program.  Saint Martin's University Student Services includes a Disability Support Services office which works with students and potential students.  We arrange those accommodations that allow our students to participate in classes and activities and have equal access to a full education here at the university alongside their fellow students, in whatever format the class is offered.

Students with medically recognized and documented (permanent or temporary) disabilities and who are in need of accommodation have an obligation to notify the University of their needs.  Students who are in need of accommodation should first contact Disability Support Services, LL Library, 438-4580.  If you need accommodations because of a disability, if you have emergency medical information that would be helpful for me to know, or if you need special arrangements in case the building must be evacuated, please make an appointment with me as soon as possible.

 

Ř Academic Dishonesty Policy

Saint Martin's University and your instructor appreciate integrity and honesty.  Please use your own thoughts, words, and ideas for your assignments.  PLAGIARISM will NOT be tolerated.  If quoting from the work of another author, please give credit by acknowledging it in your paper using quotation marks and citing the information sources. For example:  "direct quote (Author name, 2006, page number)".  When paraphrasing (or rephrasing) the work of another author, acknowledge by citing the information source.  For example:  paraphrased comments (Author name, 2006) 

Academic dishonesty consists of any of the following acts:  Assisting another student on examinations, tests, quizzes or other assignments, or receiving assistance from a student without permission of the instructor.  Using unauthorized materials for assistance during examinations, tests or quizzes or other assignments.

 

Ř Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the act of using the words and ideas of others without giving proper credit.  Common varieties of plagiarism include:

1.   Having another individual write a paper or take an examination for a student.

2.   Directly quoting material without using quotation marks or proper indentation.

3.   Not giving credit for another person's original ideas and organization.

             From SMU's "Policies and Procedures", "Academic Information pg. 77-78". 

         Original URL: 

         http://www.stmartin.edu/academics/GeneralInfo/PoliciesProcedures.aspx

Plagiarism and cheating are considered unethical actions and a violation of academic policy.  The procedures for dealing with these cases are outlined in the Saint Martin's University Student Handbook.  The Student Handbook can be found at:

http://www.stmartin.edu/studentservices/pdf/studenthandbook.pdf

 Ř Request for an Incomplete Grade

- The grade of "I" means incomplete and is given for work which is of passing quality but which, because of circumstances beyond the student's control, is not complete.  A student must request an incomplete grade in writing prior to the last week of the semester.  The request must be submitted on the University I Grade request Form to the course instructor and must specify the reason for the request.  The issuance of the grade of I is at the discretion of the faculty member teaching the course.  The approved I Grade Request Form must include specific work required to remove the incomplete.  If the instructor approves, the Office of the Registrar must receive a copy of the I Grade Request Form.

 

Ř Removal of an Incomplete Grade

The removal of an "Incomplete" is the student's responsibility.  All coursework must be completed by the end of the regular semester (Fall or Spring) following the semester in which the incomplete was granted.  An incomplete will remain on the student's transcript for one (1) regular semester (Fall or Spring) beyond the semester in which the "Incomplete" was entered.  At the conclusion of that one semester, the grade of incomplete will be converted in to a grade of "F" unless the instructor has submitted a grade change. 

Original URL and more information can be found at:         http://www.stmartin.edu/academics/GeneralInfo/PoliciesProcedures.aspx

University I Grade Request Form can be found at:

http://www.stmartin.edu/Registrar/DownloadForms.aspx